Jesus wasn’t important – he was just God’s signpost

God is all-powerful, right?

Christianity is belief that Jesus IS God embodied as a person, right?

If the Biblical story of Jesus is true, do you realize that it is the equivalent of God simply posting a big billboard saying “The rules about sin repentance have been changed”?

If God can do anything and everything, he wouldn’t have needed the dramatic events of Jesus.  If God is all-powerful, Jesus was just a signpost.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Perspective and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Jesus wasn’t important – he was just God’s signpost

  1. Derek says:

    In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made.

    That sounds like more than a signpost.

    I hope you’re doing well! It’s been a while, but it seems like you’re still writing about the same things here though. I think you need to read the Bible if you are going to get anywhere with your ideas. As it is right now, your ignorance makes your ideas bizarrely inaccurate.

    • jasonjshaw says:

      My apologies, a signpost turned into an idol would probably be more accurate.

      Sure, there has been the odd time where I have understood things with faulty context, and I am open to corrections, should they be reasonable.

      I hope you are well as well!

      Don’t expect things to be any different here, I am working within the wider context of reality, not the narrow context of assuming the Bible is definitive.

      • Derek says:

        I don’t understand what you mean by an idol: It’s a strange term to use given your position. Idols are only an issue if God is real.

        “Don’t expect things to be any different here, I am working within the wider context of reality, not the narrow context of assuming the Bible is definitive.”

        This argument makes no sense to me. If you are working within a “wider context of reality” why bring up the Bible at all? The Bible is, even to the most hardened skeptic, a cohesive collection of ideas. To pick quotes at random and then accuse others of misunderstanding them seems naive at best and intellectually dishonest at worst. The least you could do is construct an argument with some backbone rather than these drive-by attempts that aren’t worth considering for anyone who’s actually finished reading the book of John.

      • jasonjshaw says:

        You’re considering them.

        And idols are just as much an issue if there is no God. I don’t understand your argument. In the wider context of reality, the Bible gives rise to much hatred and religion is a very significant contributing factor to some of the wars going on in today’s world.

        It is especially important to help some Christians understand some basic concepts of their religion as Jesus brought a love-centred, non-violence approach, and many of those claiming to follow Jesus tend to take a direction that opposes this.

  2. Derek says:

    “Considering” is not the progressive form of the verb I would use to describe what I’m doing to your argument.

    Idols are no issue what so ever if there is no God because without God morality becomes a matter of subjectivity (I think we’ve been down this road before). Idols are even less of an issue if there is no God because what are the idols depriving of your deserved attention and praise? Nothing if there is no God. This is not a massive problem, just an interesting word choice on your part. I can’t help but think you’re just being provocative when you use these words.

    “It is especially important to help some Christians understand some basic concepts of their religion as Jesus brought a love-centred, non-violence approach, and many of those claiming to follow Jesus tend to take a direction that opposes this.”

    I agree that Jesus was non-violent, and love-centered. I disagree when you imply that Christians are violent. Also, your assertion that Christians don’t understand their religion is disheartening. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: you need to read the Bible.

    • jasonjshaw says:

      Are you aware of the war-hungry so-called-“Christian nation” known as the USA? A lot of violence stems from their nearly all-Christian government.

      It seems you need to go back to our discussions about morality, as you clearly weren’t listening and are still holding to the faulty view that morality is subjective without God. Morality is cause and effect based and while there are certainly elements of subjectivity, it is not to the extent that you seem to believe.

      Interesting info I came across a while back, the “Bible Belt” in the USA apparently has some of the highest crime, drug use, and divorce rates in the country.

  3. Derek says:

    The USA is not a Christian nation at all. The government is not all-Christian. President Obama, for example is not Christian, nor are any members of the Supreme Court (the highest court in the nation). The geographic “Bible belt” is not a fair representation of the moral stance of Christians. Your argument is completely faulty, but what frightens me more is the eagerness with which you lambast Christians on an inaccurate, illogical platform.

    • jasonjshaw says:

      George W. Bush ring any bells? And are you certain those you mention don’t identify with being Christian?

      Heck, here in Canada we have a leader who claims Christianity but pushes for war. It’s rather sickening.

      If my platform is inaccurate and illogical, why is it of any significance to you? I don’t see the logic in that.

  4. Derek says:

    I’ll give you Bush which would count twice if we assume his Dad was Christian too. To be honest I’m not sure of his religious leanings, but I would guess that he claimed to be a believer. Nonetheless I don’t see the United States as being Christian at all. I believe it was once far more tolerant of Christianity.

    • jasonjshaw says:

      Well, Christianity did once hold a much stronger position in the US than it does now. I think those who are grasping at the former power of Christian groups may be part of the growing rift between Christianity and secular society. Though, it is likely much more complex than that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s