Memory’s a Funny Thing

A modern example of the growth of legend, demonstrating how easily the same sort of thing could have happened to the story of Jesus.

Finding Truth

Recently, the ten most memorable moments of British TV were voted on, and Colin Firth coming out of the lake in Pride and Prejudice won most memorable. To commemorate, a huge statue of Colin Firth has been sculpted and has apparently been making the rounds to various lakes in Britain.

But what’s really interesting about the scene this statue depicts is that it never actually happened. Check out the following clip to see Firth talking about it:

http://www.nbc.com/the-tonight-show/video/colin-firth-never-came-out-of-the-water/2771254

And here’s a clip from the film to prove it:

This mini-series ran in 1995, and now 20 years later, people have mis-remembered a scene from it to such a degree that they’ve voted it the most memorable scene in British television history. Aside from it being an interesting anecdote, why do I bother to bring it up here? Because apologists often tell us that the period of time between Jesus’ death…

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2 Responses to Memory’s a Funny Thing

  1. Strewth says:

    Perhaps the most memorable scene was Colin Firth coming from the Lake?

    See how easy it is for memory to play tricks, and some discrepancy in reports doesn’t even need more than a few hours, as witnesses give different reports of a car crash they’ve not long ago scene.

    The mind fills in the missing bits around the major happening.

    • jasonjshaw says:

      For sure. I personally try to recall events accurately when asked, and that typically involves words like “possibly” and “I think” as well as some pauses to attempt to better remember. I find it interesting how details in stories can change when someone who chooses to tell the story confidently as if they do remember it clearly … even from earlier that day.

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